Moose Jaw Hospital changes part of Broten’s plan to end Lean

After committing to end the toxic Lean program Thursday, NDP Leader Cam Broten travelled to Moose Jaw to promise to fix the disastrous Lean design at the F.H. Wigmore Hospital.

Despite only being open for a few months, Moose Jaw’s hospital already has serious problems related to its Lean design. The waiting room is only 180 square feet – the size of four ping pong tables – causing space, seating and privacy problems. A large space in the cramped hospital is devoted to a Lean Kaizen Promotion Office. And Lean staffing has resulted in dirty conditions.

“We shouldn’t have to fix a brand new hospital, but we do, because of the Sask. Party’s failed Lean experiment,” said Broten. “An important part of my commitment to get rid of Lean is to listen to health care workers and patients in the Moose Jaw hospital, and fix what’s not working. And we’re going to roll all the desks out of the Lean Kaizen Promotion Office, and use that space for patient care instead.”

Moose Jaw resident Cheryl Pakula spoke out in January about her family’s experience at the hospital, saying that Lean staffing meant it was 10 days before her loved one’s room was cleaned. Pakula said there were syringes and other medical waste piled on the floor.

On Friday morning Broten announced that he will end the Lean program and shut down 17 Lean Kaizen Promotion Offices across the province – including the one at the Moose Jaw Hospital. Simply by eliminating Kaizen Promotion Offices, the NDP will save more than $82 million in the next term.

”The Sask. Party’s obsession with Lean defies common sense and I’m going to put a stop to it,” Broten said. “It’s time to make patients the priority – not wasteful pet projects.”