Wall busted again with bogus carbon capture bluster

Months after Brad Wall was caught being dishonest about his carbon capture boondoggle, he’s at it again. There’s a big difference between a story spun by Wall Wednesday, and the newest numbers from SaskPower.

Responding to a devastating New York Times article about his $1.5-billion carbon capture failure, Wall told media Wednesday the plant is “working, and it’s working at nameplate capacity.”

Yet, the latest information on SaskPower’s website shows that the carbon capture plant only worked 67 per cent of the time in February. Instead of capturing its nameplate capacity of more than 80,000 tonnes of carbon, it only captured 48,000 tonnes.

"Mr. Wall seems a bit arrogant if he believes Saskatchewan taxpayers – the ones footing the bill for this debacle – don't deserve the truth," said Heather McIntyre, the NDP candidate in Regina Pasqua.

"It’s our money that is funding this carbon capture mess and the smart meter fiasco. The fact that he won't tell us the truth just adds insult to injury in what is clearly a colossal waste of money. "

Instead of coming clean, Wall slammed the well-respected newspaper and seasoned journalist who wrote the article, calling the news item an opinion piece. Doubling down, Wall said he’d trust an oil company over the New York Times.

According to SaskPower, the carbon capture unit at Boundary Dam 3 was shut down for a quarter of the month, and was plagued by operational issues on numerous occasions.

In late 2015, Cam Broten and the NDP revealed a series of internal government documents that showed more than a year of Wall’s expensive, puffed-up promotion of the carbon capture experiment was based on lies. The experiment was plagued by crippling operational problems that Wall concealed while boasting that the plant was “fully operational.”

In reality, the plant didn’t work half the time, and Wall was paying tens of millions of dollars for penalties and repairs.

New York Times article

SaskPower update.