As we saw from the Sask. Party’s budget in June, the current government has no real plan to address the economic challenges resulting from the pandemic, just their old playbook of cuts.

Years of cuts have weakened our public services and our economy.

They are asking for another mandate while refusing to tell us what healthcare and education cuts they’re planning to balance the books. These cuts are a bad idea any time, but during a global pandemic they’re downright dangerous.

It’s time for a government that will put people first. New Democrats will work from day one on a transparent, well-planned return to fiscal health for the province. We will put people and families at the heart of our budgets and ensure a system that is fair and democratic.

Now is the time to invest in people to get through these challenging times. The Sask. Party talks tough about balanced budgets while tripling our provincial debt.

We’re concerned about the provincial deficit, but we’re even more worried about the deficits in our schools, our hospitals and the bank accounts of ordinary Saskatchewan families.

Going forward, we will work with an expert panel to plan our path back to balanced budgets, including setting targets for net debt-to-GDP ratio and a focus on the investments that will deliver the most growth and the greatest long-term savings.

Wise investments in people pay for themselves through increased economic activity and decreased spending on poverty, illness and crime. New Democrats are committed to health and education, forward-thinking investments, smart financing and a commitment to progressive taxation.

New Democrats have a long tradition of fiscal prudence in Saskatchewan. But while the Sask. Party talks a good game about balance, under Scott Moe’s leadership, they have not balanced a single budget.

And in fact, their choices have left us much more vulnerable to moments like this. They squandered the boom and tripled the debt.

At times like these, we need the very wealthy to pay their fair share, but Scott Moe and the Sask. Party would rather cut services than ask their wealthy friends and donors to contribute a bit more.

With a one percent tax on those with net wealth over $15 million, we will bring in an additional $120 million annually.

By asking the very wealthy in our province to pay a bit more, we’ll take responsible steps to make sure that ordinary families don’t pay the price for the Sask. Party’s mistakes and failures.